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    How to Grow and Care For Echeveria Elegans: A Complete Guide

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    Echeveria elegans succulents grouped next to each other.

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    Echeveria elegans (also known as Mexican snowball) is one of the famous and most beloved succulent plants for its highly ornamental rosettes of fleshy leaves. Its exotic shape and form (rosettes of blue-green leaves) add a bold statement to indoor spaces as a houseplant and outdoors as ground cover.
    In addition to its striking beauty, it is easy to grow and a low-maintenance succulent. This beautiful plant is native to Northeastern Mexico and can thrive best in sub-tropical climates.
    Mexican snowball is an excellent plant for beginners to start their succulent garden. Also, it helps them to learn the primary care of desert plants.
    This guide will cover all information on how to grow and care for Echeveria elegans indoors and outdoors.

    What is an Echeveria Elegans

    Mexican snowball (Echeveria elegans) is a slow-growing, clump-forming herbaceous perennial of the family Crassulaceae (also hosts the popular succulent genera Crassula, Sedum, and Kalanchoe). Echeveria contains hundreds of varieties you're probably familiar with such as Lipstick Echeveria (Echeveria agavoidies) to Echeveria Perle Von Nuremberg.
    It forms the tight rosettes of plump and spoon-shaped leaves, giving the plant a striking appearance. The leaves are triangular and fleshy with pointed ends. Its blue-green to silver-green leaves are covered with a thick layer of epicuticular wax (also known as farina) to survive the scorching sun of semi-desert areas. It also serves as a raincoat to prevent root rot.
    What makes this succulent plant more spectacular is its flowers.
    Echeveria elegans produces red or pink flowers with yellow tips on long slender flowering stalks from late winter to summer. These tubular flowers perfectly contrast with the blue-green rosettes and make the Mexican gem a gorgeous houseplant. 
    Echeveria elegans is also a great choice as ground cover for Mediterranean-style and rock gardens. It is grown in containers for summer displays in drought-tolerant or succulent gardens, patios, and green roof plants. It is cold hardy in the USDA hardiness zones 9 to 12 and flourishes all year round with rosettes and show-stopper blooms. While in colder climates, it is maintained as an indoor plant in shallow containers. 
    The other common name for this evergreen succulent plant is white Mexican rose, Mexican Hens and Chicks, and Mexican ghost plant.

    Echeveria Elegans Care Guide

    Mexican Snowball, Mexican Hens and Chicks, Mexican Gem, Mexican Ghost Plant, White Mexican Rose
    Echeveria elegans
    Crassulaceae
    8 inches tall with 1 foot wide
    Herbaceous perennial, succulent
    Northeastern Mexico
    9-12
    10-11
    Clumping, mounding
    Slow growing
    Low
    Full sun to partial shade
    Well drained, sandy loam soils
    Average (Soak and dry technique)
    Division, leaf cuttings
    Rosettes of pale-green blue or silver-green leaves
    Garden beds, borders, patios, groundcovers, rock garden, Mediterranean style garden
    Non-toxic
    Mealybugs, aphids, and root rot
    Common name
    Botanical name
    Family
    Mature plant
    Plant type
    Native region
    USDA hardiness zone
    Heat hardiness zone
    Growth habit
    Growth rate
    Maintenance
    Sunlight
    Soil
    Water
    Propagation
    Ornamental plant feature
    Uses
    Toxicity
    Pests & Diseases
    Where to Buy
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    How to Care for Echeveria Elegans

    A close-up shot of echeveria elegans rosette on a white background
    Image Source:Photo by Watcha on Getty ImagesEcheveria is a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant plant and can tolerate neglect (that’s why a popular choice for beginner gardeners).

    In their natural habitats, Echeveria plants thrive best in dry and warm climates, rocky soils, and full to partial sun. By replicating these growing conditions, the Echeveria elegans can be maintained indoors as potted plants and outdoors as ground cover.
    Providing adequate sunlight and well-draining soil is key to keeping the Echeveria succulent plant happy and healthy. Once this succulent plant is in ideal growing conditions, it continues to thrive and decorate indoor and outdoor environments with its cabbage-like rosettes.
    Also, it is a low-maintenance, drought-tolerant plant and can tolerate neglect (that’s why a popular choice for beginner gardeners).
    Note Icon
    Echeveria is an award-earning plant.
    Echeveria elegans is such a beautiful plant with its attractive rosettes (which look like Alabaster roses) that it earned the prestigious Award of Garden Merit by the Royal Horticultural Society.

    🏡 Growing Outdoors

    Echeveria elegans is cold hardy in the USDA hardiness zones 9 to 11 and make the best outdoor plants when grown as ground cover for the rock garden. Plant them in a garden site with full to partial sun exposure. The planting site should be well drained and ideally have direct sunlight for 6 hours followed by partial shade. 
    Do not grow these rosette-shaped succulents in an area that receives full sun for more than 6 hours because the scorching summer sun will bake their fleshy leaves. Also, water these succulents below and avoid wetting the rosettes to discourage fungal infections. They spread fastly and create a thick carpet of rosettes when outdoor Echeveria elegans are in perfect growing conditions.
    In growing zones below 9, grow these rosette-shaped succulents in containers as houseplants. Place them in rooms that receive bright sunlight (full to partial sun), and keep the temperatures around 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Move their containers outdoors in late spring and bring them back indoors in fall before the season's first frost.

    💧 Water Needs

    Echeveria elegans is a desert, drought-tolerant plant that can sustain underwatering conditions more than overwatering. It needs frequent watering in the growing season (spring and summer) and is sensitive to overly wet soils. Therefore, check the soil moisture contents before watering. 
    Once a week or every two weeks, a watering plan will be best for this succulent during the active growing season. In winter, the water needs of Echeveria elegans are less due to their dormancy. Be aware not to create soggy soil conditions to prevent root rot because this plant is super sensitive to waterlogged conditions.
    During winters, check your Echeveria elegans for new growths, indicating more water applications.
    How often do I water echeveria elegans?
    Like all succulents, Echeveria elegans needs a “soak and dry” watering method to thrive indoors and outdoors. Let the soil dry out completely for several days before the next watering. Once the ground is dried completely, give a thorough drench to potted Echeveria elegans and allow the draining of excess water through drainage holes. Once a week or every two weeks, a watering plan will be best for this succulent during the active growing season. In winter, the water needs of Echeveria elegans are less due to their dormancy. Be aware not to create soggy soil conditions to prevent root rot because this plant is super sensitive to waterlogged conditions.

    ☀️ Sunlight

    Echeveria elegans can survive various light conditions, but it thrives best in bright direct sunlight (for several hours) to partial sun for fuller growth. Indoor succulents grow best in west or south-facing windows where they receive bright indirect sunlight to partial shade.
    When grown outdoors, Mexican snowballs prefer full sun exposure of six hours per day with the partial sun for the rest of the day, which is best for optimal growth.

    🌡️ Temperature and Humidity

    Echeveria elegans prefer warm, dry climates for an attractive rosette shape and development. This succulent plant is super sensitive to cold temperatures, leading to severe leaf damage and scars. Mexican snowballs grow best in temperatures between 65 to 85 degrees Fahrenheit indoors or outdoors.
    While outdoors, it can withstand temperatures around 40 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit as an outdoor ground cover. The humidity levels of approximately 40% are best for healthy growth, and a highly humid environment with poor aeration can encourage root rot, Botrytis blight, and powdery mildew.

    🌱 Best Soil for Echeveria Elegans

    Echeveria elegans prefers well-draining and highly porous potting soil for its perfect rosette shape. This plant can not sustain waterlogged conditions and develops root rot, leading to no foliage growth. Therefore, provide this succulent plant with a potting mix that drains well (avoid using humus-rich potting soil with water retention properties).
    Also, choose an unglazed planter with suitable drainage holes for this succulent plant to prevent the overly wet or saturated growth medium. The best succulent soil mix for an indoor potted Echeveria plant is one part of potting soil with two pieces of perlite and one handful of river sand.

    Winter Dormancy for Echeveria Elegans

    Echeveria elegans is not a cold hardy plant and needs protection from freezing temperatures. Bring the containers of this succulent plant indoors to overwinter when the temperature drops below 45 degrees Fahrenheit.
    Situate the container in the brightest window spot, and maintain temperatures between 60 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit with less frequent watering. Keep the root hydrated as it starts blooming from late winter to summer and needs to be taken care of properly.
    The best time to bring the containers of Echeveria elegans indoors is in the fall. Do not wait until the winter comes with freezing temperatures.

    🌻 Fertilizer

    This succulent plant does not need regular fertilizer applications. Echeveria elegans can survive poor soil conditions, but an annual fertilization plan will benefit it with the best growth and rosette shape. Apply a slow-release fertilizer in mid-spring only made for succulents and cacti.
    Do not apply any fertilizer in winter because your succulent plant is resting.

    😎 Pruning and Maintenance

    Echeveria elegans is a slow-growing succulent that does not need pruning and high maintenance like some other houseplants. However, you can remove the older and weak leaves to maintain the neater look of the plant and more room for new foliage. Also, cut back the leggy stems and brown flowers to save the plant’s energy.

    ☢️ Toxicity

    Echeveria elegans is non-toxic to humans, cats, dogs, and other animals, meaning it is safe to grow and maintain indoors around curious pets.

    How to Propagate Echeveria Elegans From Leaf Cuttings

    Top View minimal style of Echeveria Elegans or Mexican Snowball blooming succulent.
    Image Source:Photo by Techa Tungateja on Getty ImagesTop View minimal style of Echeveria Elegans or Mexican Snowball blooming succulent.
    This low-maintenance Echeveria succulent can easily be propagated into new plants through leaf and stem cuttings. Spring is the best to take leaf cuttings for propagation.
    Here's the process to reproduce the Echeveria elegans through leaf cuttings:
    Propagate Echeveria Step by Step:
    1. Select a healthy leaf from the mother plant and separate it carefully by a twisting motion. Be sure to remove a small stem section with the leaf-cutting for higher propagation success.
    2. Fill a 6-inch container with a well-draining potting mix and moisten it. Place the cutting on top of the potting soil and position the pot in bright indirect light.
    3. Check the planter regularly for progress (root development). The leaf cutting will take 3 to 4 weeks to develop small white roots at the cut end of the leaf. At this stage, allow the plant to continue to grow, and you’ll notice the small plant with a tiny rosette is developing from the base of the leaf.
    4. Move the planter to a site that receives direct sunlight for 6 hours, lightly water the plant with a spray bottle, and allows soil drying between each watering. 
    5. Continue to provide proper care to the plant until the parent leaves disappear and fall off. You can transplant it to garden soil or unglazed containers as a specimen at this stage.

    How to Propagate Echeveria Elegans From Offsets

    Another best method for Echeveria elegans propagation is through division (offsets). The mature plant produces small offsets around the base that can be separated to transform into a new plant. When disconnecting the offsets from the mother plant, ensure they have one to two roots to develop into a new succulent.
    Plant the offsets in shallow containers filled with well-draining and sandy soil. At this stage, do not water it; let it rest for a few days, and keep the container in the brightest light. Provide the newly replanted offset good care and monitor for healthy growth.

    How to Repot Echeveria Elegans

    Echeveria Elegans Succulent in Clay Pot.
    Image Source:Photo by Dewin ' Indew on Getty ImagesEcheveria Elegans Succulent in Clay Pot.

    Echeveria elegans is a low-maintenance succulent plant that can grow in less nutrient soil, but good drainage is a must for healthy roots.
    It needs repotting every 3 to 4 years when the potting soil drains poorly due to compaction of pores, and the root system outgrows the drainage holes.
    When repotting the Echeveria plant, choose an unglazed container with enough drainage holes and only 2 to 3 inches bigger than the old container. Make sure to fill it with a succulent mix containing one potting soil, coarse sand, and two parts of perlite.

    Common Echeveria Elegans Disease

    Mexican Snow ball is native to semi-desert habitats in Mexico.
    Image Source:Photo by Charlie Waradee on Getty ImagesMexican Snow ball is native to semi-desert habitats in Mexico.

    The best thing about growing and maintaining an indoor succulent garden is that it remains trouble-free as long as its watering requirements are met. Overly wet soil and warm, dry weather favor the infections of Botrytis, Rhizoctonia, and Pythium fungal pathogens.
    These pathogens infect the healthy root system of the Echeveria elegans and must be appropriately managed.

    Root Rot

    This disease occurs when the root system of Echeveria elegans constantly remains in saturated soils, leading to root decay. As a result, the plant can not grow and produce new leaves due to poor soil aeration. The foliage of Echeveria elegans turns yellow and brown with deformed rosettes. In addition, the plant loses its ability to fight insect invasion and poor growing conditions.
    It is difficult to control and revive the succulent houseplant once the root rot settles in the houseplant root system. However, you can try to restore your Echeveria elegans by repotting and removing the brown, rotten roots.
    Repot the plant in a new, sterilized pot with fresh, well-draining succulent potting mix. Also, prune off the symptomatic leaves and stems to give the Echeveria succulent a fresh start.

    Common Echeveria Elegans Pests

    Propagating an Echeveria from Leaf Cuttings, Baby Echeveria plant isolated on white background with clipping path.
    Image Source:Photo by Dewin ' Indew on Getty ImagesPropagating an Echeveria from Leaf Cuttings, Baby Echeveria plant isolated on white background with clipping path.

    Aphids

    During the growing season, Echeveria elegans is prone to infestations of most houseplant pests such as aphids, mealybugs, and spider mites. Aphids suck out the juices or nutrients from the fleshy leaves of this plant.
    While feeding, they secrete the sugary substances (honeydew) on infested plant parts and attract the invasion of ants and black sooty mold fungus. Moreover, they reproduce exponentially under abundant new growths on the host plant, leading to a widespread over other healthy plants. Therefore, the early detection and control of aphids are crucial for healthy Echeveria elegans displays and ground covers.
    Apply neem oil spray with a weekly plan to deter these soft-bodied insects and prune off the badly damaged plant parts. Also, spread diatomaceous earth around the plant base to pierce the outer covering of aphids and kill them through dehydration.

    Mealybugs

    These oval-shaped pests infest the Echeveria elegans when the plant is actively growing and blooming. Mealybugs produce distinct cottony masses on infested plant parts and remain in the center of rosettes. They feed on the fleshy leaves through their sucking mouthparts, depriving plants of their nutrients. 
    Spray the infested succulent plants with soapy water and neem oil dilutions to eliminate mealybug infestations. Another best way to control the mealybug is through beneficial insects. Introduce the natural enemies of mealybugs, such as green lacewings and lady beetle, to keep their population under control. Also, remove the severely damaged leaves and discard them.

    📚 Echeveria Elegans Care Tips

    Echeveria elegans is a desert plant and is significantly drought tolerant. So when growing this succulent for your indoor dish garden and outdoor ground covers, follow these top five care tips for healthy growth.
    1. Grow this succulent in well-draining and sandy loam soils (good drainage is a must to keep the root system happy and healthy) for optimal and fleshy growth of leaves.
    2. Do not overwater the Echeveria elegans succulent
    3. Always plant the indoor Echeveria elegans in an unglazed pot with suitable drainage holes to drain the excess water.
    4. Provide this plant with the brightest indirect sunlight for the best rosette shape and fleshy leaves.
    5. Monitor the Echeveria elegans for mealybugs and use neem oil spray and rubbing alcohol solution to deter them.

    Where to Buy Echeveria Elegans

    Echeveria elegans is a low-maintenance evergreen succulent plant for interior decorations with its unique shape and form. It remains for decades and rewards plant parents with its beauty and no fussy growth habit. Moreover, it is non-toxic and safe for your pets. 
    With no further thought, add this semi-desert beauty to your home by purchasing from Neverland—it provides a high-quality plant with the best care guide.

    FAQs on Echeveria Elegans


    How fast does Echeveria elegans grow?
    Echeveria elegans is a slow-growing succulent that grows to 8 inches tall and 12 inches wide, taking several years to mature.
    Do Echeveria elegans need fertilizer?
    Like all Echeverias, the Echeveria elegans is not a heavy feeder do not need regular fertilization. However, a fertilizer feeding in mid-spring is best to boost the plant's healthy growth.
    Is Echeveria elegans edible?
    Echeveria elegans is non-toxic to humans and pets. However, eating this plant or any other succulent is not recommended because the bacteria attached to its surfaces may hurt the stomach.
    Why are my Echeveria elegans leaves falling off?
    Water stress is the leading cause of the falling off leaves, particularly overwatering. Maintain a proper watering schedule and allow soil drying between each application. Water every week once and then wait until the soil completely dries out.
    Is Echeveria elegans a cactus?
    Echeveria elegans is not a cactus but a succulent plant, a member of the Crassulaceae family. However, this succulent plant stores water in its leaves like cacti to cope with dry conditions.

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